WK 3 Respond to Discussion boards

Help me study for my Psychology class. I’m stuck and don’t understand.

Respond to at least two of your colleague’s postings in one or more of the following ways:

Ask a probing question.

Share an insight from having read your colleague’s posting.

Offer and support an opinion.

Validate an idea with your own experience.

Make a suggestion.

Expand on your colleague’s posting.

Emily:

Allies can be seen in a variety of different ways, whether it be through friends, family members, communities, groups, sports fans, etc.However, allies can also be achieved and beneficial throughout ones career.In social justice, allies are not only formed to assist a person with their needs, but to also help in reaching a common goal for a client or ensuring that social justice is met for all people (Edwards, 2006).As a school social worker, a population that I could become an ally with is the guidance counselors in the same school.When I first began as a school social worker, the guidance counselors were very territorial in thinking that I was here to complete the same tasks that they do on a daily basis.Teachers and school staff were also confused as to the difference between the school social worker and guidance counselors.However, after becoming allies and working together, we have been able to develop a system in which we know our limits and boundaries and refer students to one another when necessary.I realize that there are many things that I cannot do with students that guidance counselors do, and they realize that I can assist them with their workload and benefit our students by providing more of a mental health aspect and working with their families.Building this ally has not only assisted our students in being more successful, but it has also built relationships and allowed our jobs and school to run more smoothly.

Identify a quote or create a motto to capture the intent of your ally-ship

Guidance counselors work to make the schools a better place, school social workers work to make the student a better life.

-Within this created motto, it is a short summary to identify that the guidance counselors work within every aspect of the school- scheduling, IEP/SAT meetings, disciplinary meetings, etc.The school social worker, rather, works with students individually to address their issues or problems within the school, at home, or at work.

Identify potential obstacles to ally-ship and explain how to address them

Building an ally with the guidance counselors can be very beneficial for myself as a school social worker, but it could also cause obstacles within the school and our students.One obstacle could be that if/when a student goes to a guidance counselor to talk about issues that they may be having in the home, the counselor may decide that it would be more beneficial for the student to speak to the school social worker.From there, the student has to speak to the school social worker and, again, tell their story and explain what they are going through or how they are feeling.As we know as social workers, it is frustrating, embarrassing, and annoying to the client for them to have to continue telling the same story in order to get help.If the counselor speaks to the social worker privately about the student’s issues, the student may lose trust in the counselor for telling their problems and the counselor may have left out information or gotten information wrong about the student that could aggravate the student.With this obstacle, students could also be confused as to which person they need to seek out for information.In order to address this and eliminate these obstacles, the school as a whole can make it more clear to students to understand who to go to for what.The counselors and social workers could also come up with an initial intake document which does not have the client go into too much detail, but where they ask questions to be able to identify early which service the student needs.This will hopefully eliminate them having to explain themselves multiple times.

References

Edwards, K. E. (2006). Aspiring social justice ally identity development: A conceptual model. NASPA Journal (National Association of Student Personnel Administrators, Inc.), 43(4), 39-60.

Hollie:

Identify a population with which you could become an ally

A key component, for student affairs professionals, is working towards creating social change, by developing allies, with members of a dominant social group (Edwards, 2006).Working towards ending the system of oppression gives social justice allies greater privileges and powers, based on their memberships (Edwards, 2006).A social dominant member I would become allies are the heterosexual white college male.By engaging in social justice efforts to reform and dismantle systems of oppression, allies strive toward distributing equitable resources to members and keeping them physically and physiologically safe and secure (Edwards, 2006).

Identify a quote or create a motto to capture the intent of your ally-ship

“So as long as we are divided because of our particular identities we cannot join together in effective political action” (National Museum of African American History and Culture)

Identify potential obstacles to ally-ship and explain how to address them

By forming allies with the heterosexual white college male, they may find it difficult to form interpersonal relationships with members from the gay and lesbian communities, due to the stigma surrounding societal homophobia (Edwards, 2006).Members in dominant positions in society, who have inherited unearned privileges, suffer from a loss of authenticity and humanity (Edwards, 2006).To address the havoc unearned privileges reek on dominant group members, they may seek to dismantle the privileges they haven’t worked for, in order to become an effective, consistent, and sustainable ally (Edwards, 2006).

References

Edwards, K. E. (2006). Aspiring social justice ally identity development: A conceptual model. NASPA Journal (National Association of Student Personnel Administrators, Inc.), 43(4), 39-60.

National Museum of African American History and Culture. Retrieved from https://nmaahc.si.edu/learn/talking-about-race/top…