what ethical principles apply when working with communities?

DQ#1 what ethical principles apply when working with communities? In your population project communities, how would you go about developing relationships and coalitions to establish entry int to the community and an ethical trust?

what ethical principles apply when working with communities?

DQ#1 what ethical principles apply when working with communities? In your population project communities, how would you go about developing relationships and coalitions to establish entry int to the community and an ethical trust?  What barriers exist to do this?

DQ#2Watch the following video and visit the IHI Knowledge Center at http://www.ihi.org/knowledge/Pages/default.aspx (Links to an external site.) (Links to an external site.)

‘Pursuing the Triple Aim:’ A Conversation with the Authors (Links to an external site.)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kCeEQffSgr0Share with the rest of us what your key take away from this exploration will be to your advanced nursing practice.

More details:

Community Involvement

The context of housing health hazards involving children requires a fresh look at the ethical framework for research involving humans. The ethical principles of respect for persons, beneficence, and justice may have particular meaning. This may be  within the context of research that takes place in the home and community.

ETHICAL FRAMEWORK

The ethical principle of respect for persons incorporates both the notion that individuals should be treated as autonomous agents and that persons with diminished autonomy are entitled to protections. In the context of housing health hazards research, one can question whether the community environment compromises voluntariness of consent. The environment can be view as potentially coercive when persons are living in hazardous conditions. Also, when moving out of the situation (e.g., to better housing) is not a feasible option.

The principle of beneficence requires that persons are treat in an ethical manner. Not only by respecting their decisions and protecting them from harm, but also by facilitating their well-being. It assumes that researchers are operating in a manner that will both maximize the potential benefits. Also, minimize the possible harms of the research. Concern about the application of this principle can be raised because parents and community representatives may have markedly different assessments of the benefits and risks of such research than researchers and institutional review boards (IRBs).