What did the COPE Inventory tell you about your coping strategies?

What did the COPE Inventory tell you about your coping strategies? To what extent were you aware that you used these coping strategies?  Is there anything you would change about your coping strategies? Why?

What did the COPE Inventory tell you about your coping strategies?

Module 8 Workbook Activity

The focus of this activity is around the COPE Inventory, which offers two key outcomes:

1.       An indicator of your own individual coping strategies/styles

2.       Greater awareness of the range of possible coping strategies NOTE: a list of coping styles is described at the end of this activity

But first off…
Please provide a brief definition of stress, outlining both its positive and negative aspects:
ANSWER:

As a follow-up question, how does anxiety differ to stress?
ANSWER:

Now for the COPE Inventory!
To complete this part of the activity, please first answer the questions from the COPE inventory posted on vUWS…
The Inventory has detailed instructions, but in brief:

1. For each question in the inventory, give a number from 1-4 (1 = I don’t do this at all… 4 = I usually do this a lot)

2.       At the end of the questionnaire, you will see a number of scales, and the inventory items that correspond to those scales. Add together the numbers you gave for each of the relevant questions. For example:
Positive reinterpretation and growth: Q1, Q29, Q38, Q59 My answers: 3, 2, 3, 3 = 11

3.       The higher the score for each scale, the more you use this type of coping.

4.       Once you complete the inventory, please answer the reflective discussion questions listed on the following page:

What did the COPE Inventory tell you about your coping strategies?
ANSWER:

To what extent were you aware that you used these coping strategies?
ANSWER:

2. What do you like about your coping strategies?
ANSWER:

3. Is there anything you would change about your coping strategies? Why?
ANSWER:

4. Using your own example: a) identify current coping strategy/ies you use b) what strategy/ies might be more effective or constructive, and c) why is that strategy/ies more effective than alternatives?

E.g., let’s say I have been experiencing some distress caused by conflict between colleagues at work. I have been using denial strategies a lot to deal with these experiences, but recognise that this really is not helpful for me in the long term as it enables the problematic situations to continue…

To change my response, I could try using instrumental social support to get advice and identify if there are opportunities to change the situation, then I might employ planning and active coping to implement a strategy to make positive change. I have determined that these strategies are more effective than alternatives, like reframing, venting, emotional support or acceptance because those other strategies won’t actually change the situation causing me distress – although it might help me manage my emotions.

If, for example, the people involved in the work conflict are in positions of power/authority over my role, I might not feel empowered to use a more pro-active coping strategy, and so dealing with the emotions could be a more realistic response…
(NOTE: You can delete this example when writing your own answers!)
ANSWER:

For reference, the COPE scales/strategies include:

Active Coping Taking action or exerting efforts to remove or circumvent the stressor

 

Planning Thinking about how to confront the stressor, planning one’s active coping efforts

Seeking Instrumental Social Support Seeking assistance, information, or advice about what to do

Seeking Emotional Social Support Getting sympathy or emotional support from someone

Suppression of Competing Activities Suppressing one’s attention to other activities in which one might engage in order to concentrate more completely on dealing with the stressor

Religion Increased engagement in religious activities

Positive Reinterpretation and Growth Making the best of the situation by growing from it or viewing it in a more favourable light

Restraint Coping Coping passively by holding back one’s coping attempts until they can be of use

Resignation/Acceptance Accepting the fact that the stressful event has occurred and is real

Focus on and Venting of Emotions An increased awareness of one’s emotional distress, and a concomitant tendency to ventilate or discharge those feelings

Denial An attempt to reject the reality of the stressful event

Mental Disengagement Psychological disengagement from the goal with which the stressor is interfering, through daydreaming, sleep, or self-distraction

Behavioural Disengagement Giving up, or withdrawing effort from, the attempt to attain the goal with which the stressor is interfering

Alcohol/Drug Use Turning to the use of alcohol and other drugs as a way of disengaging from the stressor
Humour Making jokes about the stressor