We have covered two chapters from our Concise Guide

We have covered two chapters from our Concise Guide to Critical Thinking textbook. In Chapter 1, students learned why critical thinking matters, as well as how to identify claims, reasons and arguments.

We have covered two chapters from our Concise Guide to Critical Thinking textbook

We have covered two chapters from our Concise Guide to Critical Thinking textbook. In Chapter 1, students learned why critical thinking matters, as well as how to identify claims, reasons and arguments. In Chapter 2, students learned about obstacles to critical thinking. When we surrender to “self-centered thinking”; “group-centered thinking”; “resisting contrary evidence”; looking for confirming evidence” and “preferring available evidence” we are not doing justice to our argument. Also covered in Chapter 2, we learned about philosophical obstacles, such as “subjective relativism”; “social relativism” and “skepticism.” For all of these rules, you look to the opposite in order to write. You try your best not to fall into these traps, but to instead make legitimate connections and provide credible evidence. Be realistic about the opposition.

Critical thinking

To borrow from the mission statement for the nonprofit debate program Intelligence squared, you are going to write an essay that is “grounded by facts and informed by reasoned analysis.” Try not to fall into any old habits formed before you learned about how to critically evaluate.

Taking all that you have learned so far into consideration, you will select a question from the following list and write a three-page essay defending a statement pertaining to the issue. Pick whichever side you prefer, but make sure you are applying what you have learned.

I have tried to pick some contemporary controversial issues for you all to choose from. Apply what you have learned. Let the mix of ideas settle into a cohesive and well-connected piece of writing. The objective here is to present a three-page critical argument (plus a Works Cited page). It doesn’t matter which side you choose. You need to establish a central idea, come up with a solid thesis statement, and then construct a logical argument. The logical argument will depend heavily on the credibility of the support points you make. You need to incorporate at least two outside sources, to explain why each is credible and how it connects to and supports your claim. In short, you need to demonstrate the application of synthesis, which means a series of parts that come together to form a whole. In this case, your ideas will come together to prove your claim.

Hopefully there is at least one question listed below that will intrigue you. Again, choose only one.

1.      Are the media biased?

2.      Should a single corporation to own as many media outlets (newspapers, radio and TV stations, publishers, etc.) as it wants?

3.      Should the US government arrest and indefinitely imprison without trial any American citizen who is a suspect of terrorism?

4.      Should racial profiling  do security screening of airline passengers?

5.      Should Doctor-assisted suicide be legal?

6.      Should anti-vaxxers force to vaccinate their kids?

7.      Should trans-gendered people use the bathroom of their choice?

8.      Should people get fired for what they say on Social Media?

9.      Should athletes be allowed to kneel during the National Anthem?