thesis statement/argument

I’m trying to learn for my Writing class and I’m stuck. Can you help?

Directions:

For this assignment, you will be coming up with the thesis statement/argument of your next essay. In order to complete the requirements for this assignment, follow the numbered steps below

Step 1

Now that you’ve learned what the features of an argument are and how to identify one in a variety of different texts and media, it’s time to start developing your own. In order to do that, recall the three questions one must ask:

Is it arguable or debatable?
Is it specific?
The “so what? who cares?” factor
Step 2

Now consider an area of interest for yourself beyond the classroom. What are you interested in? Are you interested in any of the following?

sports
movies/television series
art
fashion
current affairs, politics
Pick a topic that interests you.

Step 3

Come up with an argument concerning your topic and answer the following questions in three paragraphs of at least four sentences each. Recall the guidelines and video from our lecture Academic Writing Is an Argument.

What topic will you be discussing in your essay? What argument will you be making about it? How is it arguable or debatable? Why might people disagree with what you’re saying (these could be your counterarguments later on)?
Is your argument specific? Include very specific details and avoid broad, vague statements.
Why should the reader care about your argument (“so what? who cares?”)? How are you going to make sure readers are interested in what you have to say and find it relevant?

Academic writing involves constructing an argument. An argument is also known as a thesis statement or main claim. It is a carefully arranged and supported presentation of a viewpoint. Throughout this course, you will read texts and identify their authors’ arguments. You will also learn to develop your own arguments when writing your papers.

Academic writing involves constructing an argument. An argument is also known as a thesis statement or main claim. It is a carefully arranged and supported presentation of a viewpoint. Throughout this course, you will read texts and identify their authors’ arguments. You will also learn to develop your own arguments when writing your papers.

When developing an argument, consider the following guidelines and questions:

I
s it arguable or debatable?
Is it specific?
The “so what? who cares?” factor

Is it arguable or debatable?

An argument is not an obvious, factual statement. It is more like your interpretation of a fact or your point of view.

Not an argument:

Computers are becoming an efficient mechanism for managing and transmitting information in large businesses. (This is a fact that few will dispute.)

Argument:

Heavy use of computers may disrupt family cohesion and increase divorce in society. (This is debatable because many people may disagree.)

Is it specific?

Your argument should be very specific. It should avoid broad, vague generalizations and include very specific details.

Poor specificity:

We should pass a law giving people a universal basic income. (This statement is not specific enough and provides few details. Who is “we,” for instance, and why should this law be passed at all?)

Good specificity:

In light of the rising level of unemployment caused by the coronavirus epidemic, Congress should enact legislation providing all Americans with a universal basic income. (Now we know exactly who “we” is and the reason this law should be passed.)

The “so what? who cares?” fact

I’m interested
in sports to be and you will be following the steps please.