The Learning Principles of Pavlov’s Classical Conditioning

Compare and Contrast the Learning Principles of Pavlov’s Classical Conditioning. Define and Explain Pavlov’s Classical Conditioning. Define and Explain Skinner’s Operant Conditioning.

The Learning Principles of Pavlov’s Classical Conditioning

A five- to ten-page paper (A five page paper will usually contain about 2000 words) is expected to be turned in by April 21, 2020, as part of the requirements for the course. The title page and the reference page are in addition to the minimum of five pages for your paper. The student is to use 1-inch margins and use a font size no larger than 12. Please use Times Roman Font. You must cite the sources you use on a reference page.

The topic for the paper is: Compare and Contrast the Learning Principles of Pavlov’s Classical Conditioning and Skinner’s Operant Conditioning. The essay should follow the following format:

Firstly,  Define and Explain Pavlov’s Classical Conditioning

Secondly, Define and Explain Skinner’s Operant Conditioning

Thirdly,  How are classical and operant conditioning alike and how are they different?

Fourthly, How has your life been affected by classical and operant conditioning?

More details;

Both classical conditioning and operant conditioning are processes that lead to learning. Classical conditioning pairs two stimuli, while operant conditioning pairs behavior and response. The learning occurs before the response in classical conditioning and after the response in operant conditioning.
Operant conditioning is a method of learning that occurs through rewards and punishments for behaviour. Through operant conditioning, an individual makes an association between a particular behaviour and a consequence (Skinner, 1938). … Skinner’s views were slightly less extreme than those of Watson (1913).

What are the similarities of classical and operant conditioning?
Classical and operant conditioning are both similar because they involve making association between behaviour and events in an organism’s environment and are governed by several general laws of association – for example, it is easier to associate stimuli that are similar to each other and that occur at similar times.