”The Autobiography of Eleanor Roosevelt” by Eleanor Roosevelt

Must read ”The Autobiography of Eleanor Roosevelt” by Eleanor Roosevelt. How would this person define leadership? And, what was at the core of their leadership philosophy?

 “The Autobiography of Eleanor Roosevelt” by Eleanor Roosevelt

 

Section 1:

Firstly, How would this person define leadership? And, what was at the core of their leadership philosophy? (1 page)

Secondly, Explain by drawing on the biography, providing examples from their life, and quoting only where necessary.

Section 2:

Firstly, What 3 – 4 character traits, habits or practices made them an exceptional or unexceptional ethical leader? (1 – 1.5 pages)

Secondly, Explain by drawing on the biography, providing examples from their life, and quoting only where necessary.

Section 3: 

Firstly, What 3 things did you learn from this person’s experience/leadership that can help you be a more ethical leader? (1 – 1.5 pages)

Secondly, Explain by drawing on the biography, providing examples from their life, and quoting only where necessary.

Lastly, Conclusion: Conclude by sharing your overall assessment of the leader. What do you think was right about this person’s approach to leadership and/or what do you think was wrong? (1 page)

 

Plot of ”The Autobiography of Eleanor Roosevelt” by Eleanor Roosevelt

Firstly, A candid and insightful look at an era and a life through the eyes of one of the most remarkable Americans of the twentieth century, First Lady and humanitarian Eleanor Roosevelt.

Also, The daughter of one of New York’s most influential families, niece of Theodore Roosevelt, and wife of President Franklin Delano Roosevelt, Eleanor Roosevelt witnessed some of the most remarkable decades in modern history, as America transitioned from the Gilded Age, the Progressive Era, and the Depression to World War II and the Cold War.

Further, A champion of the downtrodden, Eleanor drew on her experience and used her role as First Lady to help those in need. Intimately involved in her husband’s political life, from the governorship of New York to the White House, Eleanor would eventually become a powerful force of her own, heading women’s organizations and youth movements, and battling for consumer rights, civil rights, and improved housing.

Additionally, In the years after FDR’s death, this inspiring, controversial, and outspoken leader would become a U.N. Delegate, chairman of the Commission on Human Rights, a newspaper columnist, Democratic party activist, world-traveler, and diplomat devoted to the ideas of liberty and human rights.