Prepare a presentation to recommend your implementation plan 

Will prepare a presentation to recommend your implementation plan to the appropriate audience for your innovation (e.g., venture capitalists, your CEO, your board of directors, etc.).

Prepare a presentation to recommend your implementation plan

Will prepare a presentation to recommend your implementation plan to the appropriate audience for your innovation (e.g., venture capitalists, your CEO, your board of directors, etc.). Your goal is to persuade the audience to back your plan. Prepare 4 professionally developed presentation slides that accomplish the following:

Describe the innovation and its value to both customers and the organization/entity to which you are pitching your idea.

Review the implementation plan in significant enough depth to demonstrate your thorough understanding of the implementation process.

Include a cost/benefit analysis appropriate for your particular audience.

Ensure your slides are visually appealing and conform to conventions of effective slide design. Include a reference slide with a minimum of three secondary resources utilized in the development of your presentation.

More details;

How Venture Capital Works

Invention and innovation drive the U.S. economy. What’s more, they have a powerful grip on the nation’s collective imagination. The popular press is filled with against-all-odds success stories of Silicon Valley entrepreneurs. In these sagas, the entrepreneur is the modern-day cowboy, roaming new industrial frontiers much the same way that earlier Americans explored the West. At his side stands the venture capitalist, a trail-wise sidekick ready to help the hero through all the tight spots—in exchange, of course, for a piece of the action.

As with most myths, there’s some truth to this story. Arthur Rock, Tommy Davis, Tom Perkins, Eugene Kleiner, and other early venture capitalists are legendary for the parts they played in creating the modern computer industry. Their investing knowledge and operating experience were as valuable as their capital. But as the venture capital business has evolved over the past 30 years, the image of a cowboy with his sidekick has become increasingly outdated. Today’s venture capitalists look more like bankers, and the entrepreneurs they fund look more like M.B.A.’s.