Materials of Civilization

This paper focuses on Materials of Civilization. The paper should include information about a particular material discovery, material improvement, property discovery, property improvement

Materials of Civilization

The paper should include information about a particular material discovery, material improvement, property discovery, property improvement or process development, material improvement, property discovery, improvement, or process development that impacted the course of human civilization. What technology did it displace in its application (if any)?How did its development come about? Who did it?Did geography play a role? Did anything else have to be develop in order for your topic to have happened? Was there any controversy involve along the way?Was the adoption slow or rapid, and why?

More details;

Social, political, and environmental characteristics of early civilizations

Firstly, the growth of agriculture resulted in intensification, which had important consequences for social organization.

Secondly, larger groups gave rise to new challenges and required more sophisticated systems of social administration.

Thirdly, complex societies took the forms of larger agricultural villages, cities, city-states, and states, which shared many features.

Fourthly, specialized labor gave rise to distinct social classes and enabled creative and innovative developments.

Further, systems of record-keeping and symbolic expression grew more complex, and many societies had systems of writing.

A new social order

About 12,000 years ago, human communities started to function very differently than in the past. Rather than relying primarily on hunting or gathering food, many societies created systems for producing food. By about 10,000 BCE, humans began to establish agricultural villages.

This had massive ramifications on the social sphere, marking an important departure from past social systems; people lived in larger, denser, and more permanent settlements, and not everyone had to devote their full time to food production. Since there was no need for all residents to devote themselves full time to producing food, specialization within society was made possible. Thus, 
surplus food, food that did not go directly to farmers’ families, was distributed to members of the society.