Look at a case study on resistance to antibiotics

For this week’s discussion we will look at a case study on resistance to antibiotics. The case study examines resistance to the most commonly used antibiotics.

Look at a case study on resistance to antibiotics

For this week’s discussion we will look at a case study on resistance to antibiotics. The case study examines resistance to the most commonly used antibiotics.  For this week’s discussion you will have the opportunity to collect and also analyze data and discuss your results.

Read through the attached case study and answer any 4 questions using your textbook and the internet as resources. Make sure to let us know what question # you are answering.  Write your post in a narrative format based on your answers to the questions.

More details;

About Antibiotic Resistance

Antibiotic resistance happens when germs like bacteria and fungi develop the ability to defeat the drugs designed to kill them. That means the germs are not killed and continue to grow.

Infections caused by antibiotic-resistant germs are difficult, and sometimes impossible, to treat. In most cases, antibiotic-resistant infections require extended hospital stays, additional follow-up doctor visits, and also costly and toxic alternatives.

Antibiotic resistance does not mean the body is becoming resistant to antibiotics; it is that bacteria have become resistant to the antibiotics designed to kill them.

Antibiotic Resistance Threatens Everyone

Antibiotic resistance has the potential to affect people at any stage of life, as well as the healthcare, veterinary, and agriculture industries, making it one of the world’s most urgent public health problems.

Each year in the U.S., at least 2.8 million people are infected with antibiotic-resistant bacteria or fungi, and more than 35,000 people die as a result.

No one can completely avoid the risk of resistant infections, but some people are at greater risk than others (for example, people with chronic illnesses). If antibiotics lose their effectiveness, then we lose the ability to treat infections and control public health threats.

Many medical advances are dependent on the ability to fight infections using antibiotics, including joint replacements, organ transplants, cancer therapy, and treatment of chronic diseases like diabetes, asthma, and also rheumatoid arthritis.