Lincoln’s practical and idealistic views regarding ending the Civil War

Explain Lincoln’s practical and idealistic views regarding ending the Civil War, Using specific examples and line numbers from both the Emancipation Proclamation and the Gettysburg Address.

Lincoln’s practical and idealistic views regarding ending the Civil War

Using specific examples and line numbers from both the Emancipation Proclamation and the Gettysburg Address, explain Lincoln’s practical and idealistic views regarding ending the Civil War.

What was Abraham Lincoln trying to accomplish in the Gettysburg Address?

In it, he invoked the principles of human equality contained in the Declaration of Independence and connected the sacrifices of the Civil War with the desire for “a new birth of freedom,” as well as the all-important preservation of the Union created in 1776 and its ideal of self-government.

What did Lincoln think about the Gettysburg Address?

The speech reflected his redefined belief that the Civil War was not just a fight to save the Union, but a struggle for freedom and equality for all, an idea Lincoln had not championed in the years leading up to the war.

What did the Emancipation Proclamation declare?

President Abraham Lincoln issued the Emancipation Proclamation on January 1, 1863. This time the nation was approaching its third year of bloody civil war. The proclamation declared “that all persons held as slaves” within the rebellious states “are, and henceforward shall be free.”

What is the main purpose of the Gettysburg Address?

Lincoln’s main purpose was to urge everyone to honor those who had died at Gettysburg. This could be done by striving to maintain the kind of nation imagined by America’s founders. President Lincoln delivered the Gettysburg Address on November 19, 1863.

What states did the Emancipation Proclamation apply to?

The Proclamation applied in the ten states that were still in rebellion in 1863. This did not cover the nearly 500,000 slaves in the slave-holding Border States (Missouri, Kentucky, Maryland or Delaware) which were Union states. Those slaves were freed by later separate state and federal actions.