How does the beauty industry’s obedience to eurocentric beauty standards enhance colorism among people of color?

How does the beauty industry’s obedience to eurocentric beauty standards enhance colorism among people of color?
Find sources for the topics of job discrimination, mental health, and physical health of people of color.

How does the beauty industry’s obedience to eurocentric beauty standards enhance colorism among people of color?

How does the beauty industry’s obedience to eurocentric beauty standards enhance colorism among people of color?
Further, find sources for the topics of job discrimination, mental health, and physical health of people of color.

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Colourism: How skin-tone bias affects racial equality at work

Colourism is a form of discrimination base on skin tone, perpetuate by the global beauty industry. Where sales of skin-lightening products are project to reach $8.9 billion by 2024.

Studies have shown the existence of a wage gap linked to skin colour, which widens as the shade of the worker darkens.

Companies are urge to be aware of ‘beauty bias’ – and also to address it through unconscious-bias training, among other methods.

Racial discrimination at work has been under much scrutiny from academics and journalists. But less considered is the subject of skin-tone bias, or colourism.

Unlike racial bias, which is usually perpetrate by individuals of one race against those of another, colourism is also frequently observe among members of the same ethnic or racial group.

Among the many dimensions of bias that are being test by Project Implicit, a long-term research project based at Harvard University, is something called skin-tone bias, also, quite separately from racial bias “often reveals an automatic preference for light-skin relative to dark-skin”.

Colourism and beauty

In a Tedx Stanford talk she gave in 2016 entitled “Confessions of a D Girl: Colorism and Global Standards of Beauty”, Stanford Graduate Business School student Chika Okoro talks about colourism and also its pervasiveness in the entertainment industry, using the example of a casting call for the 2015 movie Straight Outta Compton.