For the Argumentative Essay-Norton Introduction to Literature textbook

For the Argumentative Essay, students will make an argument about a short story from the Norton Introduction to Literature textbook that we have not examined in class and support it with a literary analysis of the story.

For the Argumentative Essay-Norton Introduction to Literature textbook

Firstly, For the Argumentative Essay, students will make an argument about a short story from the Norton Introduction to Literature textbook that we have not examined in class and support it with a literary analysis of the story. Students will come up with a topic that interests them (see prompts below). Formulate a narrow thesis, and support the thesis with a literary analysis of the text.

An Argumentative Essay should contain a brief introduction and paraphrase of the story. Also, an explanation of the story’s theme, the thesis statement and forecast. Each paragraph will support the thesis with clear topic sentences, which in turn will be supported by examples and quotations from the story. The conclusion paragraph should bring a sense of completeness and closure to the essay.

You may choose from one of the essay prompts below;

Firstly, Why does Connie leave with Arnold Friend at the end of Joyce Carol Oates’ “Where are You Going, Where have you been” (125)?

Secondly,  James Baldwin once stated, “I grew up with music, you know, much more than with any other language. In a way the music I grew up with saved my life.” How does music save lives in Balwin’s “Sunny’s Blues?” (93).

Thirdly,   Analyze point-of-view and narration in Edgar Allan Poe’s “The Cask of Amontillado” (178). Is the narrator reliable?

Fourthly,  How does Jing-Mei’s definition of Chinese change throughout Amy Tan’s “A Pair of Tickets” (302)?

Furthermore,  In Herman Melville’s “Bartleby, The Scrivener: A Story of Wall Street” (661), why does Bartleby refuse to write?

Also, What do the three items the kids encounter at the toy store symbolize in Toni Cade Bambara’s “The Lesson” (146)?

Lastly, Analyze setting in James Joyce’s “Araby” (168). How does the setting shape the characters and plot of the story?

In conclusion, Your answers to these questions must be supported with a literary analysis of the text!