Does the way we talk about war, nuclear war, strategy 

Does the way we talk about war, nuclear war, strategy (and other things like terrorism) make these things more or less likely? What are the practical implications of a better understanding of gendered concepts in nuclear strategy? What did Cohn expect to learn when she started her study, and what was she surprised to learn along the way?

Does the way we talk about war, nuclear war, strategy

Does the way we talk about war, nuclear war, strategy (and other things like terrorism) make these things more or less likely? What are the practical implications of a better understanding of gendered concepts in nuclear strategy? What did Cohn expect to learn when she started her study, and what was she surprised to learn along the way?

More details;

What will the spread of nuclear weapons do to the world? I say ‘spread rather than prolifer­ation’ because so far nuclear weapons have proliferated only vertically as the major nuclear powers have added to their arsenals. Horizontally, they have spread slowly across countries, and the pace is not likely to change much. Short-term candidates for the nuclear club are not very numerous. and they are not likely to rush into the nuclear military busi­ness. Nuclear weapons will nevertheless spread, with a new member occasionally join­ing the club. Counting India and Israel, membership grew to seven in the first 35 years of the nuclear age. A doubling of membership in this decade would be surprising. Since rapid changes in international conditions can be unsettling, the slowness of the spread of nuclear weapons is fortunate.

Someday the world will be populate by ten or twelve or eighteen nuclear-weapon states (hereafter refer to as nuclear states). What the further spread of nuclear weapons will do to the world is therefore a compelling question.