Cognition, Communication, and Language ROBERT M. SEYFARTH AND DOROTHY L. CHENEY

Cognition, Communication, and Language ROBERT M. SEYFARTH AND DOROTHY L. CHENEY. Write a response essay. Response essay is 1 to 2 pages and includes a brief summary of the article and answers the questions such as….

Cognition, Communication, and Language ROBERT M. SEYFARTH AND DOROTHY L. CHENEY

Write a response essay. Response essay is 1 to 2 pages and includes a brief summary of the article and answers the questions such as;

Firstly, what are the important points made in the article,

Secondly, why do you think they are important,

Thirdly, are there any points that you criticize,

if yes, what are your opinions about it,

Finally, elaborate on it, substantiate your opinions.

More detail;

Field studies in Africa over the past four decades by ethologists Dorothy Cheney and Robert Seyfarth have uncovered a trove of insights into the behavior, communication, and social cognition of nonhuman primates. The pair’s research further reveals evolutionary antecedents of the human mind. University of Pennsylvania professors emeriti, Cheney and Seyfarth are both elected members of the National Academy of Sciences. For her Inaugural Article cowritten with Seyfarth, Cheney strengthens the hypothesis that many primate vocalizations shape social interactions. Factors driving the early stages of language evolution may therefore be in association with primate social challenges.

Inspired by Darwin

As youths, Cheney and Seyfarth enjoyed travel and nature. Cheney’s father was in the US Foreign Service, so her family move to a different place every few years before returning to Washington, DC. “My parents’ rather laissez faire approach to child-rearing allowed my sister and me to travel alone around India in our teenage years,” says Cheney. “We were given complete independence, for which I’ve always been grateful.” Seyfarth’s father was a Chicago-based businessman. “He also loved the outdoors, and on fishing trips to Canada and the Caribbean, taught me how to enjoy the wilderness even when we didn’t catch fish,” Seyfarth says.

Cheney and Seyfarth were not initially drawn to science. Cheney preferred history at her preparatory school in Massachusetts, Abbot Academy, and Seyfarth at first struggled with science. He says, “I found science courses difficult and unappealing until, in my senior year at Phillips Exeter Academy in New Hampshire, I took a course on Darwin. The theory of evolution brought everything into focus and made all that memorization seem worthwhile.” Cheney’s “Darwin moment” happened in the spring term of her Wellesley College senior year. She explains, “I took a history of science course on evolution and genetics that finally revealed to me the ‘big why,’ the narrative and coherence that I’d missed in my previous classes. Darwin’s theory of natural selection provided the framework for everything in biology. Suddenly, I wanted to retake all of my science classes.”