According to sociologists like Kimmel and Ehrmann, men have to

According to sociologists like Kimmel and Ehrmann, men have to constantly prove their masculinity to others, making achieving it always elusive, and proof is always suspect.

According to sociologists like Kimmel and Ehrmann, men have to

Firstly, According to sociologists like Kimmel and Ehrmann, men have to constantly prove their masculinity to others, making achieving it always elusive, and proof is always suspect.

First, explain how and why sociologists consider male dominance over other subordinate men and women—is not explained by biological urges, but built into society’s social institutions (family, media, education, economy) and societal rewards for appropriate gender role behavior.

Use Kimmel, Maccoby, McIntosh, Wade/Marx-Ferree, or other course materials in your answer.

What makes this ideology of male dominance hegemonic, as defined in this course (NO GOOGLE SEARCHES—USE CLASS LECTURES AND TEXTS).

Then, reflect upon your own experience within a hierarchy of male dominance. Pay close attention to intersections of other demographics relevant to your biography. Who are you, such as your gender identity, sexuality, age, citizenship status, race, or other identity intersections explored in Wade/Marx-Ferree.

How does your position in this hierarchy make you feel in terms of power over your life experiences thus far?  How can you—on the micro-level of interactions—transform a hegemonic masculinity ideology in meaningful ways, if you want to at all?

Instructions:

In 3-5 full pages free of grammatical errors and devoid of typos, double-spaced sentences with no additional spaces between paragraphs. Written with Times or Arial 10- or 12-point font. Also, 1” or 1.25” margins, answer the topical question at the end of these instructions using an argument-model of essay writing.

More details;

What is male dominance in society?
Patriarchy is a social system in which men hold primary power and predominate in roles of political leadership, moral authority, social privilege and control of property. Some patriarchal societies are also patrilineal, meaning that property and title are inherited by the male lineage.